An agreement does not produce the same results for everyone. Some benefit from its terms and others are harmed.
It remains to be seen who will be the winners and losers from the FYROM naming agreement – if and when it is implemented.
Already
there is one beneficiary. Even as the discussion was focused on the
FYROM issue, the government passed the worst medium-term fiscal
programme that the country has ever seen.
With
the passing of the omnibus bill by parliament, Greek citizens are being
saddled with what is essentially a fourth bailout memorandum, but
without money this time.
For the first
time in the nearly ten years of crisis, low income bracket pensioners
will suffer pension cuts, and the have-nots will see the tax-free
threshold reduced.
All of this is happening at a
time that there is no indication that in the coming period the
government’s fervent desire for debt relief will be satisfied.
It
would be politically inappropriate to use the agreement with FYROM as a
smokescreen, in order to pass the medium-term programme almost
unnoticed.
Citizens have the right to know what
awaits them, and the additional cost that they will be forced to pay,
when the current bailout ends and the country enters an era of strict
supervision.

The government benefited from the circumstances, but it cannot benefit at the expense of citizens.