The sacking of former alternate labour minister Rania Antonopoulou was certainly the right thing to do. Yet it is only a part of a larger issue that has arisen for the government. The problem involves the entire ruling majority, and not just one individual.

It is inconceivable to sack Ms. Antonopoulou simply because her signature was on the rent subsidy application, and leave her husband and economy minister Dimitris Papadimitriou in his place, even though he lives in the same home and is benefiting from the same law.

He too is exposed, and perhaps more so, if one considers that he hid behind his wife’s signature to do something equally unethical.

The ruling party is also exposed. The legal provision used by the two ministers was tabled by someone. They included it in the third bailout memorandum law, which had a host of measures that were hard for the people to bear.

Then the law was passed by the ruling majority, including those who hastened to condemn the avaricious minister.
It has been rightly said that this government has adapted all the bad habits of the last four decades.

One must now say that it is the first time this has been done amidst a crisis, when Greek society is suffering, and by a government that has used its much-touted moral superiority as an alibi.